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Canada the real winner of Super Tuesday

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to reporters after the Republican National Committee Presidential Primary Debate in Houston, Texas, on Feb. 25, 2016. GETTY IMAGES/Joe Raedle.

With Republican Donald Trump and Democratic rival Hillary Clinton each picking up seven states during Super Tuesday, pundits are having trouble declaring the ‘real’ winner ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

But one clear winner stood out from the pack: Canada.

It may still be an empty threat but Americans are looking at how to make a cross-border move a reality if their chosen candidate doesn’t make it to the White House. After Super Tuesday,  searches for “how can I move to Canada” spiked by 350 per cent on Google.

Simon Rogers, a data editor at Google, posted the statistic on Twitter. A few hours later, NBC journalist Stephanie Chuang noticed searches for “how can I move to Canada” had actually increased by 1,150 per cent. By Wednesday morning, it had spiked even further.

Google searches for “move to Canada” can be seen on the chart below. It appears that the largest spike happened just before 8 a.m. on Wednesday, as if Americans woke up, realized what happened, and wanted out.

A chart shows a massive spike in Google searches for "move to Canada." Image credit: Google.
A chart shows a massive spike in Google searches for “move to Canada.” Image credit: Google.

 

Google wasn’t the only online notice: Canada’s immigration website posted a notice about delays, a notice that was still up at 12:20 p.m. on Wednesday, long after polls had closed in the States. The crash may have been Toronto councillor Norm Kelly’s fault: He tweeted out a link to the site to his “American followers.”

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Canada’s immigration website posted a notice about delays after Super Tuesday in the United States. Screen grab taken March 2, 2016.