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New stats show just 24 convicted out of 1,100 G20 arrests

Statistics released by the Ministry of the Attorney General on Monday have shed light on the progress of legal proceedings in relation to last summer’s G20 Summit in Toronto.

More than 1,100 people were arrested during the tumultuous weekend, marking the largest mass arrest in Canadian history.   Hundreds were detained during the infamous ‘kettling’ incident at Queen and Spadina on June 27th, 2010.

Most were released without charge.

Almost a year later, only 24 out of 317 people charged with a G20-related crime have been convicted.

More than half initially charged, 58 per cent, had their charges dropped.

39 had charges dismissed after agreeing to donate a sum to charity (direct accountability).  

The cases of 56 people are still unsettled, with nine still being sought on warrants.

Here’s a rundown:

  • 270 individuals have had their matters completed:
  • 24 pleaded guilty
  • 39 were completed through direct accountability
  • 11 were subject to peace bonds
  • 187 were stayed, withdrawn or dismissed
  • 9 individuals were listed in error, which is typically a result of duplication, for example a person being named twice.
  • 56 individuals still have matters before the courts:
  • 47 individuals have had their matters adjourned and are scheduled to appear on or before October 5, 2011
  • 9 individuals have warrants outstanding for their arrest